Traditional Russian Folk Costumes

Browse For Traditional Russian Folk Costumes at Halloweenize | Price Comparison For Traditional Russian Folk Costumes: newest deals, sales, reviews, and shopping information

Find Traditional Russian Folk Costumes Deals

Find Traditional Russian Folk Costumes Halloween shopping results from Amazon & compare prices with other Halloween online stores: Ebay, Walmart, Target, Sears, Asos, Spitit Halloween, Costume Express, Costume Craze, Party City, Oriental Trading, Yandy, Halloween Express, Smiffys, Costume Discounters, BuyCostumes, Costume Kingdom, and other stores.

TOP 10 Traditional Russian Folk Costumes Results

  • Girls Russian Folk Traditional Sundress and Blouse Set "Dashenka" 7-8 Years

    Fashion never stops changing, but traditional, national costumes will always be in style and in demand. This set represents holiday attire for Russian women, worn across the villages. Traditionally, both sundresses and kokoshnik headdresses were decorated with intricate embroidery which, depending on the social status, may have included gold thread [read more]

  • Russian Traditional Folk Costume Headdress Kokoshnik "Victoria" burgundy #130

    The kokoshnik is a traditional Russian headdress worn by women and girls to accompany the sarafan, primarily worn in the northern regions of Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries. This folk headdress can be worn during folk performances and also it's a great souvenir from Russia.

  • Russian Traditional Folk Costume Headdress Kokoshnik "Elena" burgundy #109

    The kokoshnik is a traditional Russian headdress worn by women and girls to accompany the sarafan, primarily worn in the northern regions of Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries. This folk headdress can be worn during folk performances and also it's a great souvenir from Russia.

  • Russian Folk Girl's Headdress, Kokoshnik Dlya Devochki (Red)

    The word "kokoshnik" is derived from the archaic Slavic word "kokosh," meaning chicken. It is an old, traditional headdress in the shape of a wave crest, that is an integral part of a holiday women's Russian folk costume.

  • Russian Traditional Folk Costume Headdress Kokoshnik "Larisa" white #115

    The kokoshnik is a traditional Russian headdress worn by women and girls to accompany the sarafan, primarily worn in the northern regions of Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries. This folk headdress can be worn during folk performances and also it's a great souvenir from Russia.

  • Russian Traditional Folk Costume Headdress Kokoshnik "Alina" blue #739

    The kokoshnik is a traditional Russian headdress worn by women and girls to accompany the sarafan, primarily worn in the northern regions of Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries. This folk headdress can be worn during folk performances and also it's a great souvenir from Russia.

  • Russian Folk Costume 'Kokoshnik' Headdress in Light Blue

    The word "kokoshnik" is derived from the archaic Slavic word "kokosh," meaning chicken. It is an old, traditional headdress in the shape of a wave crest, that is an integral part of a holiday women's Russian folk costume.

  • Russian Traditional Folk Costume Headdress Kokoshnik "Alina" white #569

    The kokoshnik is a traditional Russian headdress worn by women and girls to accompany the sarafan, primarily worn in the northern regions of Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries. This folk headdress can be worn during folk performances and also it's a great souvenir from Russia.

  • Russian Traditional Folk Costume Headdress Kokoshnik "Elena" black #547

    The kokoshnik is a traditional Russian headdress worn by women and girls to accompany the sarafan, primarily worn in the northern regions of Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries. This folk headdress can be worn during folk performances and also it's a great souvenir from Russia.

  • Alyonushka Sundress (Red) by Bestavantage

    A sarafan is a traditional Russian long, trapeze-shaped dress, or sundress, worn as Russian folk costume by women and girls. The Nikon Chronicles first mentioned it in the year 1376. The shapes and styles of a sarafan changed from century to century, from the northern to the southern lands, and from peasants to noblewomen. As far back as the XIV ce [read more]